- Uncategorized

Broken Pieces: A Library Life, 1941-1978

Broken Pieces A Library Life From his earliest reading memories in wartime Britain through five decades of librarianship eminent librarian and former ALA President Michael Gorman offers insights from his extraordinary career in

  • Title: Broken Pieces: A Library Life, 1941-1978
  • Author: Michael E. Gorman
  • ISBN: 9780838911044
  • Page: 296
  • Format: Paperback
  • From his earliest reading memories in wartime Britain through five decades of librarianship, eminent librarian and former ALA President Michael Gorman offers insights from his extraordinary career in this new memoir Gorman relates his personal and professional journey in prose that is by turns charming, opinionated, and revealing He made perhaps his most significant contFrom his earliest reading memories in wartime Britain through five decades of librarianship, eminent librarian and former ALA President Michael Gorman offers insights from his extraordinary career in this new memoir Gorman relates his personal and professional journey in prose that is by turns charming, opinionated, and revealing He made perhaps his most significant contribution to librarianship as editor of the 1978 Anglo American Cataloguing Rules, a major development that receives detailed attention here The debates and arguments that would shape professional practice for years to come are dramatically presented, with a vivid cast of characters including leading librarians from two continents Broken Pieces, Gorman s account of being on the front lines of many of the most important decisions made in librarianship during his career, is a timely and entertaining read.

    • ☆ Broken Pieces: A Library Life, 1941-1978 || Ã PDF Read by ↠ Michael E. Gorman
      296 Michael E. Gorman
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Broken Pieces: A Library Life, 1941-1978 || Ã PDF Read by ↠ Michael E. Gorman
      Posted by:Michael E. Gorman
      Published :2019-05-24T12:33:46+00:00

    1 thought on “Broken Pieces: A Library Life, 1941-1978

    1. Michael Gorman's career impacted my professional life as a cataloger from day one. The advent of AACR2 coupled with MARC records (a pilot project at the LC law collection in 1968) changed basic practices and to this day determines bibliographic access. His autobiography thus brought back many names in the library field whose work I read in professional journals. It was also interesting to hear his opinion of Univ. of Illinois libraries with which I'm familiar.p.xi: "Nothing in this book is deriv [...]

    2. If you are or have ever been a bookish person, a librarian, or an Anglophile, you will find something to like in this book. (I am all three.) There are those who consider Gorman to be hopelessly retrograde and curmudgeonly these days -- and he has some choice words for what he considers misguided trends in contemporary librarianship -- but it's important to remember that he has always been guided by the public service spirit of Ranganathan's five laws of library science. He admits that possibly [...]

    3. I adore Michael Gorman and always have. He is the ultimate Librarian's Librarian; Cataloger's Cataloger. His autobiography is as interesting as he is wonderful.

    4. Reading the memoir of my dear friend was an odd experience. I remembered many of the incidents and even conversations he described, and had met many of the key library characters. I am actually mentioned several times toward the end of the book. Even if I were not such an old friend of the author, I would have found it a charming, often funny, touching and revealing look at a key time, and a key player in library history.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *