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Here Comes The Sun

Here Comes The Sun The sun rises late dirty and so badly in need of a service it s a wonder it gets up at all The moon s going to be scrapped soon and a new one commisioned but then they ve been saying that for yearsA

  • Title: Here Comes The Sun
  • Author: Tom Holt
  • ISBN: 9781857231878
  • Page: 132
  • Format: Paperback
  • The sun rises late, dirty and so badly in need of a service it s a wonder it gets up at all The moon s going to be scrapped soon and a new one commisioned but then, they ve been saying that for yearsAll is not well with the universe, and though there s a hell of a tidying up job to be organised after some carelessness with earthquakes and tidal waves, surely it s craThe sun rises late, dirty and so badly in need of a service it s a wonder it gets up at all The moon s going to be scrapped soon and a new one commisioned but then, they ve been saying that for yearsAll is not well with the universe, and though there s a hell of a tidying up job to be organised after some carelessness with earthquakes and tidal waves, surely it s crazy to get mortals to run the show Things may be bad, but isn t that going to extremes The irrepressible Tom Holt hits the mark yet again with a dazzling foray into fantasy of the hilarious kind.

    • Free Download [Science Book] ✓ Here Comes The Sun - by Tom Holt é
      132 Tom Holt
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      Posted by:Tom Holt
      Published :2019-04-24T19:17:26+00:00

    1 thought on “Here Comes The Sun

    1. This book was recommended to me because of similarities to Terry Pratchett. I bought it 7 or 8 years ago but didn't or couldn't read it then for some reason. This time around I found it to be an easy read and funny, but only smirk funny, not LOL funny. When reading Pratchett, I often laugh audibly, but this one didn't quite get me there.This book is British and of it's time (published in 93, I think) to an extent that forced me to look up words or references at least 3 times and I decided not to [...]

    2. I still like Holt, but he's starting to wane. This is mainly because he is moving away from the Wodehouse/Benson situational type of humor to the Pratchett one-liner & pun type. No, that's not quite the description either. What Holt has been missing in these last few books is a simple coherency of plot. The plot is there, but rather than following one or two characters (Wodehouse tends to follow only one, the viewpoint character), Holt has taken to Douglas Adams-ing and going from direct nar [...]

    3. The premise is extremely intriguing and seemed perfect for the kind of situational, satirical humour I love. However, the book is let down by a hopelessly meandering plot without a hint of coherency. I would recommend reading it for a few brilliant bits in the middle, like the Holy Roman Emperor who has no knowledge of his divine stature and runs a down-on-its-luck pizza parlour, or the hilarious depiction of Heaven and Hell as administrative bodies and all the red-tape and nonsense that goes wi [...]

    4. Low 1. At times writers of homorous prose decide to place greater store by their own inventiveness than by addressing key aspects of all good storytelling, such as plot development. In this instance, Holt missed a golden opportunity as the idea behind the story held great promise, of the ethereal powers-that-be in charge of the universe needing help from a mere mortal to set their house in order. In reality, the plot becomes unwieldy with a cast of charcaters thrown haphazardly into the mix, lea [...]

    5. Holt combines old beliefs in the celestial hierarchy of angels with the British Civil Service to demonstrate just why the world is such a mess. Not only is the Sun wearing out, but one of the angels has been forced out due to his finding out about how the origin of life was botched, and the devil Ganger (who's a pretty nice guy despite his job) brings in a mortal named Jane, who has some ideas as to how the universe can be run more efficiently. It's pretty funny, but it's clear that Holt was sti [...]

    6. Probably the weakest effort I've yet read by Holt. The plot was convoluted, nonsensical (not in the good way) and ultimately resulted in not much of anything. None of the characters were particularly compelling. The only redeeming quality was that there were just e ough interesting set-pieces to keep me plodding through. Probably closer to 2 1/2 than to 3.

    7. All is not well with the universe, as it is very inefficiently run by the heavenly bureaucracy, which is in dire need of a shake-up. And that's what it gets when a bored human office-worker called Jane gets a job there as a management trainee. An enjoyable story, which explains some of the oddities of the world's underground railways (see chapter 16).

    8. Here Comes the Sun (1993) perhaps the most science-fictional of Holt's fantasies postulates an Alternate Cosmos in which constant intervention is required to keep the Sun lumbering on its daily course using Steampunk-like Technology operating with the inefficiency of British industry and civil servants at their caricatured worst.

    9. This should be very funny, but it didn't work for me. I will try another Holt book, but I had a hard time getting through the allegory and sticking with this.

    10. Hilarious, cynical book about the inefficiency of most offices and businesses in general, especially the ones running the earth. I do prefer Small Gods though.

    11. Not one of his better ones. I wish I had those hours of my life back! Don't waste your time with this one. Stick with "Expected You to be Taller" or "Ye Gods!".

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