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Yiddishkeit: Jewish Vernacular and the New Land

Yiddishkeit Jewish Vernacular and the New Land Yiddish is everywhere We hear words like nosh schlep and schmutz all the time but how did these words come to pepper American English In Yiddishkeit Jewish Vernacular and the New Land Harvey Pekar

  • Title: Yiddishkeit: Jewish Vernacular and the New Land
  • Author: Harvey Pekar Paul M. Buhle Nick Thorkelson Nathaniel Buchwald Allen Lewis Rickman Joel Schechter Sharon Rudahl Danny Fingeroth
  • ISBN: 9780810997493
  • Page: 111
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Yiddish is everywhere We hear words like nosh, schlep, and schmutz all the time, but how did these words come to pepper American English In Yiddishkeit Jewish Vernacular and the New Land, Harvey Pekar and Paul Buhle trace the influence of Yiddish from medieval Europe to the tenements of New York s Lower East Side This comics anthology contains original stories by notabYiddish is everywhere We hear words like nosh, schlep, and schmutz all the time, but how did these words come to pepper American English In Yiddishkeit Jewish Vernacular and the New Land, Harvey Pekar and Paul Buhle trace the influence of Yiddish from medieval Europe to the tenements of New York s Lower East Side This comics anthology contains original stories by notable writers and artists such as Barry Deutsch, Peter Kuper, Spain Rodriguez, and Sharon Rudahl Through illustrations, comics art, and a full length play, four major themes are explored culture, performance, assimilation, and the revival of the language The last fully realized work by Harvey Pekar, this book is a thoughtful compilation that reveals the far reaching influences of Yiddish.Praise for Yiddishkeit The book is about what Neal Gabler in his introduction labels Jewish sensibility It pervades this volume, which he acknowledges is messy he writes You really can t define Yiddishkeit neatly in words or pictures You sort of have to feel it by wading into it The book does this with gusto New York Times Yiddishkeit is as colorful, bawdy, and charming as the culture it seeks to represent Print magazine every bit of it brimming with the charm and flavor of its subject and seamlessly meshing with the text to create a genuinely compelling, scholarly comics experience Publishers Weekly Yiddishkeit is a book that truly informs about Jewish culture and, in the process, challenges readers to pick apart their own vocabulary Chicago Tribune a postvernacular tour de force The Forward A fascinating and enlightening effort that takes full use of the graphic storytelling medium in an insightful and revelatory way The Miami Herald With a loving eye Pekar and Buhle extract moments and personalities from Yiddish history Hadassah gorgeous comix style portraits of Yiddish writers Tablet Yiddishkeit has managed to survive, if just barely, not because there are individuals dedicated to its survival, though there are, but because Yiddishkeit is an essential part of both the Jewish and the human experience Neal Gabler, author of An Empire of Their Own How the Jews Invented Hollywood, from his introduction

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      111 Harvey Pekar Paul M. Buhle Nick Thorkelson Nathaniel Buchwald Allen Lewis Rickman Joel Schechter Sharon Rudahl Danny Fingeroth
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      Posted by:Harvey Pekar Paul M. Buhle Nick Thorkelson Nathaniel Buchwald Allen Lewis Rickman Joel Schechter Sharon Rudahl Danny Fingeroth
      Published :2019-05-12T20:51:44+00:00

    1 thought on “Yiddishkeit: Jewish Vernacular and the New Land

    1. To me the biggest downside is the fundamental difficulty of the chosen medium: it's so difficult to get into the subject of Yiddish when you don't hear it. But hey, I bought into this dilemma when I decided to get this book. Maybe a future project like this could combine sound and graphics?The only other complaint I have is the mixture of excessive name dropping and lack of a critical view. I don't expect such a project to be very critical about its subject, the book is not a scientific essay. A [...]

    2. Fascinating topic, but I was surprised to find that the graphic novel format detracted rather than added to the information conveyed. The text was quite dense and the illustrations ended up obscuring all of the facts.

    3. 3.5 stars. This is actually a history of Yiddish America. Like many collections, some articles are less engaging, some felt encyclopedic. Overall it was a neat overview.

    4. Probably not quite 4 stars, but still a really happy way to scratch the surface of Yiddishkeit for a interested party. Which I’m. So lovely visuals, too.

    5. Really nice Graphic Novel about yiddish culture and its impact from a master of the Comix genre: Harvey Pekar.

    6. Another readable compilation from Buhle and Pekar, both of whose works I've read here and there over the years. These compilations sometimes don't etch into my memory very strongly (or maybe they often don't), but there are always details that stick with me. This was similar. It's so weird to imagine this parallel linguistic universe here in the states, one that interacted heavily with non-Yiddish speakers, and one that had a flourishing culture and economy all its own. In the much more Angliciz [...]

    7. An exploration of all things Yiddish in America (and elsewhere), literature, theater, newspapers, edited by the late great author of American Splendor. There's a wealth of information in this book and the contributors are an impressive list. I really like the idea of combining these different media--graphic novel format, conventional prose, play script and so on--to talk about all these different aspects of Jewish culture, but I didn't enjoy the experience of reading them. It's choppy, almost as [...]

    8. I had higher hopes for this one. I spoke with a former colleague who worked on the book and he said it seemed "a bit all over the place" and that was my take as well. The design and art are top notch but it seems like they took front-and-center over content. This not what I would call a good introduction to Yiddish culture or even a good encapsulation about what makes Yiddish, Yiddish. It's hard because I found Wex's Born to Kvetch so incredibly dry/boring so I can't recommend that either. The b [...]

    9. The last fully realized work by the late Pekar, this anthology unveils the lasting influence of Yiddish on American culture. The beautiful, original stories (which includes a play and numerous essays), crafted by a host of creators including co-editor Buhle, Barry Deustsch, Peter Kuper, Allen Lewis Rickman, Spain Rodriguez, Sharon Rudahl, Gary Dumm, David Lasky, Sam Marlow, Danny Fingeroth, Joe Zabel and Pekar himself, explore the history, origins, and the meaning of Yiddishkeit ("Jewishness" as [...]

    10. A really neat anthology of Yiddish—spoken, written, and sung! This graphic novel offers a diverse set of writers and illustrators penning different narratives, histories, and plays about Yiddish language and culture all the way from medieval Europe to the present day America. A really curious piece of work! My one issue is that because I am not versed in Yiddish, it was hard to read Yiddish words and sentence because I had no way of hearing the word or the cadence of how a sentence should be s [...]

    11. I got this as a gift and it was a true gift, since it is a book I never would have thought to get for myself but it is nice to have it. The content (it's not exactly a story) encompasses the history of Yiddish writing in the 19th and 20th centuries. And it is careful to explain that the very fabric of Yiddish culture is found in the writing and language. The fact that this thisbook is largely a graphic novel--or, in fact, a series of shorter strips that are somewhat interconnected-- makes the ma [...]

    12. Scripted largely by Harvey Pekar and illustrated by an all-star cast of graphic artists, this is an irreverent and brilliant history of Yiddish from the shetls of Eastern Europe into the literature, labor activism, theater and popular culture of the diaspora culture around the world. I particularly enjoy the song in which Esther's Persian Emperor dies and is confronted by his ex-wife, "S'kotsl kumt, mayn man! Vos makht epes mayn kanarikl? Un ver shpilt af mayn fortepyan?" Then again, I was kicke [...]

    13. This is a book that I'd like to download to my brain without having to go through the experience of reading it. Similar to A Most Imperfect Union: a Contrarian History of the United States by Ilan Stavans, it's full of some great stuff, but the format is ultimately inappropriate to deliver it. When graphic novels are great, they tell very real stories through images and experiences which complement and support each other. In books like this, an attempt is made to cram a full-on nonfiction textbo [...]

    14. A really fascinating collection of illustrated essays on East European Jewish/Yiddish culture. There are pieces on its origins, the source of the language, unique characteristics of the literature and its influence upon American culture. Written mostly by Harvey Pekar (American Splendor) and illustrated by a whos-who of indie-comics artists, this is one of those rare titles to hand to people that think comics can only tell one or two types of stories. A wonderful last work from Pekaris book make [...]

    15. a bit detailed for me, more than a dozen authors i've not heard of have their works gone into some detail by pekar, got kind of lost for a while. the sections on theatre/film and american popular culture were fun, learned a lot, enjoyed the art (peter kuper started out out as an inker on richie rich?! i don't enjoy his spy vs. spy so seeing the work here really impressed me.) dan archer and the woman that did the isadora duncan graphic bio have beatuiful work here as wellkar's final book and, if [...]

    16. DONE. I am done with my 60 reviews. And this one -- PEKAR this was frustrating -- I felt like it had lot of nice bits of info on individual stories of Yiddish luminaries, but all in all it felt a bit too much like you had to have a strong prior knowledge of Yiddish art and literature going into it. Which a comic book reader and not a Yiddish scholar -- my knowledge is middling. Feh. I know it's one of your "last works" but I felt some stronger editing and a more comprehensive narrative rather th [...]

    17. Though it can be a little dry at times, Yiddishkeit should be required reading for American Jews (like myself), or anyone who has an interest in Jewish culture. Yiddish is a language that was so integral to my great-grandparents and grandparents, but they refused to share that with their children because they wanted to be more secular, and a common culture thread has been lost, with only a smattering of phrases left behind. I felt a little more connected to my Polish family while reading this, a [...]

    18. For a graphic novel,Yiddishkeit is surprisingly dense. It is a survey of yiddishkeit/yiddishkayt that is encyclopedic in its ambition and I will definitely use it as a reference book regarding Yiddish history, literature, performance, and language. It is as beautiful as it is educational and while it is not necessarily an easy read, it had a huge impact on me and shifted my relationship with Yiddish culture and being; I now think this history is an integral component of my Jewish identity.

    19. Unusual format, attractively presented as a graphic novel exploring vignettes of the Yiddish literary scene from Europe to the Americas in the 19th and 20th centuries. Some stories are sad, some are amusingly gossipy, but it's a vivid portrait over all of this largely disappeared literary universe. There is some interesting discussion on the revival of Yiddish in the late 20th century, but the most vivid portrayals are of long gone figures.

    20. Graphic format treatise on Yiddish literature in America edited by the late, great Harvey Pekar, and former history and American civilization professor Paul Buhle. Includes a few prose excerpts of short stories, plays, poetry and humor. Not to be missed!

    21. I tried but it didn't do it for me. I'm glad it exists, I'm glad someone brought this information into a compendium, but there was too much text and it didn't draw me in. I blame the head injury. :-)

    22. This is a fascinating guide to the history of Yiddish literature and theater. An anthology, some of the pieces are better than others, but the overall work serves as a fairly effective tool for gaining a broad sense of the history of Yiddish.

    23. This was probably 50% interesting, 50% things I didn't particularly care about. It was more about the use of Yiddish in culture than the actual Yiddish language (vocabulary).

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