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Ah, Treachery!

Ah Treachery Ah Treachery the last novel Thomas wrote before his death tells the story of one Captain Edd Twodees Partain drummed out of the Army and hounded by rumors of his involvement in a secret operation

  • Title: Ah, Treachery!
  • Author: Ross Thomas Joe Gores
  • ISBN: 9780312327040
  • Page: 347
  • Format: Paperback
  • Ah, Treachery , the last novel Thomas wrote before his death, tells the story of one Captain Edd Twodees Partain, drummed out of the Army and hounded by rumors of his involvement in a secret operation in El Salvador Twodees gets hired on to help a fundraiser for the Little Rock folks recover funds that were stolen from an illicit stash used to smooth over problems andAh, Treachery , the last novel Thomas wrote before his death, tells the story of one Captain Edd Twodees Partain, drummed out of the Army and hounded by rumors of his involvement in a secret operation in El Salvador Twodees gets hired on to help a fundraiser for the Little Rock folks recover funds that were stolen from an illicit stash used to smooth over problems and pay off hush money Meanwhile, Partain is involved in a storefront operation called VOMIT Victims of Military Intelligence Treachery trying to defend former intelligence operatives such as Partain from those who are trying to cover up the past permanently.

    • [PDF] ½ Free Read ☆ Ah, Treachery! : by Ross Thomas Joe Gores ✓
      347 Ross Thomas Joe Gores
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      Posted by:Ross Thomas Joe Gores
      Published :2019-07-14T05:11:23+00:00

    1 thought on “Ah, Treachery!

    1. Late Ross Thomas, and not among his best, in my opinion, but still worth re-reading if you're a fan. It has all the Thomas hallmarks of dry wit, cool detachment, wearily jaded heroes, banally evil bad guys, intrigue, corruption, blackmail and, of course, treachery. Thomas wrote the best, most believable political thrillers of the last four decades of the twentieth century.In this one, set just after the presidential election of 1992, a couple of high-ranking army officers who made out like bandi [...]

    2. I was a fan of Ross Thomas decades ago. I remember I particularly liked hisChinaman's Chance. I met him at one show or another in the 90s and had invited him to speak at the William Saroyan Writers' Conference, an invitation he accepted. Unfortunately he died shortly before the conference. I remember his wife calling to tell me of his death. I thought I'd read every novel he'd had written but recently found a copy of Ah, Treachery in my signed books collection. I must have gotten it from him the [...]

    3. This is how it is done. Ross Thomas is the undisputed master of the spy/murder/mildly political thriller. This may be his best writing and unfortunately so close to his last book. Set on LA and DC (which comes alive to me) with the usual snappy dual first person dialogue/third person perspective and all the sartorial, culinary, architecture and design descriptive that mysteries thrive on for setting the scene. Multiple murders, current and ex-military characters, cops, spies, thugs rainmakers an [...]

    4. (Annoyingly, not the edition I own, and I have neither the time nor the inclination to add it.)The last book by Thomas before his death, and he's better than ever with betrayed soldiers and spies and Generals and political fund-raisers and murders and missing millions all wound up in a complex, intricate plot told with the usual energised cyncism. Here's an absolutely terrific round-up of Thomas' writing career: dothemath.typepad/dtm/ah-t

    5. Re-reading Ross Thomas week ends with his last book which is set during the Clinton transition. Usually expert atmosphere for both LA and Washington as well as for how politics and money go together. The two bad guys are just a little too bad in covering up a problem that probably wouldn't be that big a problem; their violence is disproportionate. A nice curveball near the end though.

    6. If Elmore Leonard had written political thrillers, they would have read an awful lot like Ross Thomas. And that's the highest praise I can give Thomas. Just a fantastic writer.

    7. Book explans what happenedCia and army playing tricks thought the were immune from consequences good mystery with a trail for the money and the dirty deeds

    8. One of Ross Thomas' best, and that's saying a lot. I was sorry to finish it because it was entertaining from start to finish.

    9. Very stylish. I just finished it and am not quite sure what it was all about, but I think, once I dwelled over it on my drive to work or home or so, I will have put it all together.I know that every action and reaction made sense immediately or soon after I read it, but all the pieces have not fallen into place yet. Nevertheless, they will, I'm sure.The book had the feel of an old noir-novel, with a little more politics, but mostly about tough guys, tough gals and the people they meet, all of th [...]

    10. Ross Thomas some say reads like a handbook for what's happening behind the scenes but didn't really want to know. He scrapes away the surface and his characters take on lives of their own. In this book he explores the politics of politics, and sure doesn't pull any punches with the levels of corruption, graft, and treachery. Some people I've read say that reading Ross Thomas is being introduced into the world of sociopaths-nice ones as well as bad ones-and maybe they were right. This one's too o [...]

    11. As a long time fan of Thomas, it was a delight catching up with his stylized take on political corruption, this time with a dose of military shenanigans in El Salvador. Captain Edd "Twodes" is drummed out of the Army when he's fingered as a patsy in a government cover-up in a brutal, not so secret campaign in Central America. He's seen and done it all. Convoluted plot line covers a lot of ground, but it's all fun and in the hands of a master story teller, it works. How can you not like an organi [...]

    12. The males were wise cracking, the girls spunky and quirky. The characters were fun enough that they made up for a fairly lackluster reveal of all the threads of the mystery.

    13. Ross Thomas's final novel before his death. His writing is crisp, irreverent, funny and provocative right to the end.

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