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English as She Is Spoke; Or, a Jest in Sober Earnest

English as She Is Spoke Or a Jest in Sober Earnest This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before This IS NOT an OCR d book with strange characters introduced typographical errors and jumbled words This book may have occasional imperf

  • Title: English as She Is Spoke; Or, a Jest in Sober Earnest
  • Author: Pedro Carolino José da Fonseca
  • ISBN: 9781148331744
  • Page: 181
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923 This IS NOT an OCR d book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process We beThis is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923 This IS NOT an OCR d book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

    • Best Read [Pedro Carolino José da Fonseca] ↠ English as She Is Spoke; Or, a Jest in Sober Earnest || [Biography Book] PDF ✓
      181 Pedro Carolino José da Fonseca
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Pedro Carolino José da Fonseca] ↠ English as She Is Spoke; Or, a Jest in Sober Earnest || [Biography Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Pedro Carolino José da Fonseca
      Published :2019-06-01T01:02:33+00:00

    1 thought on “English as She Is Spoke; Or, a Jest in Sober Earnest

    1. I have to admit to really loving Engrish and all the various other varieties of English that are twisted out of recognition. It is the closest I come to doing cryptic crossword puzzles, well, other than talking with my intellectually disabled older sister. I once bought an Asian Santa toy thing that laughed when you knocked it. Not so much for the laugh (which was more spooky than seasonal or joyous) but for what was written on the box it came in. The toy was called, ‘Can’t Invert With Laugh [...]

    2. Mark Twain was an early admirer of this classic of unintentional humor. "Nobody can add to the absurdity of this book, nobody can imitate it successfully, nobody can hope to produce its fellow; it is perfect, it must and will stand alone: its immortality is secure." The authors of this linguistic disaster were not fools. Both had written respectable works in Portuguese, they just happened to know no English. And since their guide was to be the first English/Portuguese phrase book, they had nothi [...]

    3. "A popular English idiom - 'to craunch the marmoset' ."A strangely specific masterwork of unintentional comedy.Sometimes I wonder why a book was published, but not often do I wonder just what exact kind of surreal forces caused a book to be written.Say you didn't know a language. Not its phrases, nor greetings, nor even 99% of its words. Not its swearwords, even. Does the thought ever occur to you to write a guidebook on how to speak this language you don't know? Well, the thought occurred to th [...]

    4. "A little master frizzled, perfumed and covered of gold, had leaded to the church, for to marry, a coquethish to the dye glistening the parson, having considered a minute that disfigured couple, told him: 'Now before to pronounce the conjungo, let avow me for fear of quiproquo, which from both is the bride?'"

    5. A beautifully asinine book. Indescribably hilarious. 'To craunch the marmoset?' Is there a better phrase in English?

    6. What happens when you use a Portuguese-French phrasebook and a French/English dictionary (and zero knowledge of English) to make a Portuguese-English phrasebook? This happens. It's hard to pick a favorite "common" English phrase, but I am especially amused by "You hear the bird's gurgling?" For extra giggles, read aloud. In short, this book really craunched the marmoset.

    7. Wildly hilarious. Really. One of the funniest thing to read for anyone who understands English. The sheer absurdity of this book is quite remarkable. If Engrish makes you laugh, you will love this one.

    8. The joke is that English as She is Spoke was originally written as a Portuguese to English phase book in 1855. Why it funny is that the authors and here the real story starts winding down on the modern fan. The original author Jose De Fonseca wrote the original book which was a decent effort, later Pedro Carolino, re-wrote it and used the earlier author’s name to add credibility to this new failed version.The new version, a portion of which is republished here is a disaster. It seems that one [...]

    9. Researching the old “All Your Base” on led us to this new discovery. Really helps to read it out loud. Can’t wait to read it to my nieces and nephew.

    10. This book is absurdly hilarious, a fact which is compounded because this book was a sincere attempt to educate people. To quote Mark Twain's preface: "There are sentences in the book which could have been manufactured by a man in his right mind, and with an intelligent and deliberate purposes to seem innocently ignorant; but there are other sentences, and paragraphs, which no mere pretended ignorance could ever achieve—nor yet even the most genuine and comprehensive ignorance, when unbacked by [...]

    11. This is the first book in the Collins Library series. First, a little history for those of you who might not be familiar with this book: English as She Is Spoke is a 19th century phrasebook purporting to translate common phrases from Portuguese into English. At first glance it sounds all fine and dandy, right? Almost. Turns out that there was a slight problem: neither of the authors of this little tome actually spoke English. How did this happen, you might ask? Well, supposedly, the book started [...]

    12. of what use is Shakespeare and all these fanciful english writers to a non english speaker wishing to master enough english words for practical everyday conversation? NONE. Enter then this little book which teaches you the words you need and makes examples of them in regular everyday conversations. e.g here's a perfectly good question you might have about books and reading.Do you like the reading good deal too many which seem to me? And a perfectly fine answer; That is to me a amusementAnd if yo [...]

    13. From the blurb: In 1855, when José da Fonseca and Pedro Carolino wrote an English phrasebook for Portuguese students, they faced just one problem: they didn't know any English. Even worse, they didn't own an English-to-Portuguese dictionary. What they did have, though, was a Portuguese-to-French dictionary, and a French-to-English dictionaryI remain somewhat convinced that this a prank, but the title page does list the early publication date. This book is funny on two levels, first the fact tha [...]

    14. This is a fascinating look at an epic fail of a guide to learning English. There are so many fun little gems in here that I am going to have to incorporate some into my daily speech. (It was melydia's 'Well, that really craunches the marmoset' on Facebook that led me to this book.)I gave this edition only 3 stars because I now see other editions that are arranged more interestingly. They show more of the original Portuguese, which piques my linguistic curiosity. So while I highly recommend this [...]

    15. I purchased this book for my husband on sale through the McSweeney's website about a year ago. On a whim, seeing it on the bookshelf I decided to pick it up and read it. I really enjoyed many portions of the book, but there were also many parts that were too incomprehensible to even find funny. I took French in college as an elective course, so I did enjoy this book from the perspective of knowing what happens when you translate French to English word for word (which Carolino did). Overall, it's [...]

    16. This is one of those things the Internet (and its precursors before it) rediscovers every five or so years. Nobody seems to agree on the details of its origins—whether it had one author or two, in which year it was published, &c.—and the quality of the translations is so inconstant it seems likely at least parts of it were added by one of the various people who republished it specifically to make fun of it.I enjoy laughing at foreigners as much as the next person, but English As She is S [...]

    17. Some lists from the first pages:For the table.Some knivesSome groceriesSome crumb.Kitchen utensils.The skimming-dishThe potlidThe pothangerThe spungeThe sparkThe fireThe smokeThe cloutThe jackParties a Town.The butcheryThe cause-wayThe sinkThe low eating houseThe obelis-ksThe prison, geol& later on:For to swim.I row upon the belly on the back and between two watersere's also a very nice list of Idiotisms and Proverbs at the end

    18. English as she is spoke, the full monty. Mark Twain in his introduction to the abridged american edition wrote: Whatsoever is perfect in its kind, in literature, is imperishable: nobody can imitate it successfully, nobody can hope to produce its fellow; it is perfect, it must and will stand alone: its immortality is secure.Only thing I can add is that the unabridged edition including the Portuguese text unveils the maddening genius of this enterprise.

    19. I stubbled upon this book through a comment writer and professor Paul Collins made in one of his books. It is a English phrase book from Portuguese. It is not a book to read front to back, but to be skimmed through looking for the hysterical direct translations. This specific edition is part of the Collins Library, and Paul Collins' introduction to the book includes the history of it's popularity in Victorian society. A interesting change of pace for book lovers.

    20. Before machine translation and before internet oversharing, the English-speaking world had this book. I would love to know how this book actually got published in the UK and the US and can only imagine that it was accepted for its comedic merits. It’s interesting mostly from a historical point of view, since there’s now a wealth of similarly bad translations available online. Probably because I've worked both as a translator and an English teacher, I enjoyed it well enough.

    21. I got this book for G a couple of Christmases ago and we read sections of it to each other in tears it was so funny. A completely ludicrous English phrase book that has the most bizarre conversations and listings of things I have ever read in horrible English. So bad that contemporaries thought it was a fraud. I don't care if it's real or not, this book is hilarious and should be in every bathroom worldwide.

    22. " A great book. True: light, to entertain, with a fluid and rich text. Although the Sendero/political/social questions are just touched and are there to support the story/characters it throws some light on Peruvian people, villages, institutions, recent history. The reading was a great pleasure and fun. "

    23. This book is admittedly hilarious and at first I frequently laughed out loud at the absurdity of the 'translations'. But the effect lessens over time, even if the quality doesn't, and I couldn't quite get through the paragraph-length anecdotes at the back. I can definitely see the appeal of owning a copy of this and leafing through it from time to time or pulling it out for the unacquainted.

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