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Odi ed Epodi

Odi ed Epodi Luce di paesaggi danze amori conviti con gli amici e in sottofondo l affanno del tempo che fugge l ansia dell ignoto e un senso costante della morte che rende pi struggente il valore della vita q

  • Title: Odi ed Epodi
  • Author: Horace Alfonso Traina Enzo Mandruzzato
  • ISBN: 9788817165136
  • Page: 480
  • Format: Paperback
  • Luce di paesaggi, danze, amori, conviti con gli amici, e in sottofondo l affanno del tempo che fugge, l ansia dell ignoto e un senso costante della morte che rende pi struggente il valore della vita questo Orazio Composti tra il 40 e il 13 a.C negli Epodi e nei quattro libri delle Odi Orazio rivers le tensioni di una vita perennemente agitata dall inquietudine e daLuce di paesaggi, danze, amori, conviti con gli amici, e in sottofondo l affanno del tempo che fugge, l ansia dell ignoto e un senso costante della morte che rende pi struggente il valore della vita questo Orazio Composti tra il 40 e il 13 a.C negli Epodi e nei quattro libri delle Odi Orazio rivers le tensioni di una vita perennemente agitata dall inquietudine e dall insoddisfazione, con una lingua e uno stile che resteranno nei secoli modello di assoluta purezza e di inimitabile eleganza Ma sullo sfondo si intravedono anche i segni profondi di un intera epoca, segnata dalle guerre civili e dall instaurazione del regime augusteo e dalla trasformazione radicale di valori consolidati e di sicurezze acquisite L introduzione di Alfonso Traina incentra la sua indagine sull intimo rapporto tra il lessico e le tematiche della lirica oraziana.

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      Posted by:Horace Alfonso Traina Enzo Mandruzzato
      Published :2019-09-01T15:44:46+00:00

    1 thought on “Odi ed Epodi

    1. Not salacious enough for my Latin taste: I prefer Ovid (esp Ars Amatoria and Remedia Amoris) as did Shakespeare, I believe, and Martial as did Byron but not his mother. Rousseau in his Discours sur les Sciences blames my favorites for the decline of Rome from the "cradle of virtue to the theater of crime"(see my rev).You can't accuse Horace of sumptuous corruption in taste, though you might accuse him of beginning what Wilfred Owen, dying in WWI called, the Old Lie: "Dulce'et decorum'st pro patr [...]

    2. Some were pastoral, some dealt with the gods, others were about war or in praise of mighty Augustus or Horace's BFF Maecenas. For the most part the translation was fine but twice he scared me by using "spic and span" and "shanghai'd", luckily, he didn't go in that direction again

    3. "I have built a monument more long-lasting than bronzeand set higher than the pyramids of kings.It cannot be destroyed by gnawing rainor wild north wind, by the processionof unnumbered years or by the flight of time."(III.i-v)Big fan. I studied Horace a bit in school and wrote a dissertation about themes of time and transience in his poetry. I impressed myself with my volume of mythological knowledge! (Was that from eight years' school study of Latin or reading Percy Jackson? Maybe both.) I esp [...]

    4. This book contains both the Odes and Epodes of Horace, written between about 30 and 13 b.c. 17 short poems make up the Epodes, which were modeled off of the poems of Archilochus. Topics include war (including some very good poems touching on the civil wars and the Roman victory at Actium), love, and abuse. The Epodes are proto-Augustan in the sense that they seek to glorify the Roman state and Roman ideals, but they avoid monotonously singing the praises of Fearless Leader Octavian (thankfully). [...]

    5. "¿Para qué el enorme pino y el blanco chopo gustan de unir sus ramas en hospitalaria sombra? ¿Para qué el agua fugaz se abre camino, trepidante, por el quebrado arroyo? Manda que traigan vino, perfumes y encantadoras rosas -flores en demasía pasajeras-, mientras lo permiten tu patrimonio, tu edad y los negros hilos de las tres hermanas."Lo que más sé y recuerdo de Roma son sus grandes batallas y héroes denodados como Marco Antonio, Julio César, Régulo, Escipión entre otros. Pero exist [...]

    6. Horace was the Pindar of the Augustan Age and perhaps willingly, but he sort of had to be if he wanted to compose poetry, and so like Shostakovich, what appears as celebration ("The Centennial Hymn") is rather to be suspected as bitter irony. Due to the fact that the irony in many of these poems is concealed about as well as an Andy Kaufman stand-up, there are many dark and obscure references, but those that shine through give a glimpse into an exceeding mastery of language and nuance. In additi [...]

    7. Who does not love Horace? I just pulled the portable Whitman off the shelf and found an old bookmark for 'Give me the Splendid, Silent Sun' which begins 'Give me etc of course, then 'with all his beams full-dazzling./Give me juicy autumnal fruit ripe and red from the orchard' etc. Not nearly as elegant and robust as Horace but there is something there. Isn't there? Maybe it's the sense of command.

    8. First time I have ever read Horace. I was absolutely riveted all the way through! And I grew up despising poetry of any kind. Long may Horace be read.

    9. Nice translations, unfortunately without the Latin text (which can be found here: perseus.tufts/hopper/t).

    10. It's great to have all of Horace in one collection, even if we are dependent upon David West's translation discretion (which is not exercised much during the epodes but seems to come in during the odes). At times, West's translation seems rather odd, as if he is neither trying to get the most out of Horace's poems nor trying to be as literal to Horace's language as possible within the not-as-rigid-as-most-foreign-language-learned-people-seem-to-think-it-is-confines of English. I'm no expert on e [...]

    11. Una buona edizione per un classico degno della sua fama.La qualità del prodotto è insindacabile, l'opera di Orazio non viene studiata per caso. Critica e sagacia si alternano con grazia e i componimenti offrono una buona varietà d'argomenti. Personalmente ho preferito le Odi.Non è il modo migliore per accostarsi all'autore, nonostante editoriali e approfondimenti ben fatti non mi sento di consigliarlo come primo approccio. Se al contrario già si sa quali chiavi di lettura usare, è un libro [...]

    12. Keep this in mind: a steady head on a steep path; the same holds true when the going is good:don't let happiness go to your head,friend Dellius, for you must die somedayRich and descended from ancient Inachus,or poor and from the lowest class, loiteringout in the open, it is all one:an offering to Death, who has no tears.All of us are being herded there, for alllots are tossing in an urn: sooner, later,out they will come and book our passage on the boat for everlasting exile.

    13. Bravo-Tyrrhen -Carpe Diem -Encased in a Latin philosophers tomb are the precious drops of Skull and Bone shards to cherish.-Is it bits of whimsical lyric where the sport of clowns renders illusions or a sage lyrist of talent who braves the pressure to increase a rank and file with brutality of truth, ahhh the sword cuts two ways- "Be wise ! Drink free" and crush the fears of death ! -Why would Homer deny "excessive dalliances with self gratification" in times of war ? SAHNBCT2018

    14. I highly recommend Horace's haunting Carpe Diem poems, and W.G. Shepherd's elegant translations do them justice. My favorite? Ode 1.4, Solvitur acris hiems. These lines in particular:Pallid death kicks impartially at the doorsof hovels and mansions. O happy Sestius,*the brief sum of life invalidates long-term hopes.*Lucius Sestius, appointed Consul by Augustus in 23 B.C.

    15. For folks who studied Latin, you may feel his translations are a bit off, or modernized for easier consumption. It's nice they're there though so you don't have to look at your dictionary constantly.

    16. Horace is probably the most difficult Latin author that I read with my high school students. The poems on the new IB syllabus are a well chosen lot from book 3 (although I would have liked them to include the fons Bandusia. I love the Loeb bilingual editions.

    17. When your attempts to force poetry into its original metre destroys all lyricism and even makes much of it impossible to understand, you have to ask yourself if your translation really serves any purpose at all.

    18. If nothing else, read one of the finest poems ever composed, which opens:Diffugere nives, redeunt iam gramina campisarboribusque comae;mutat terra vices et decrescentia ripasflumina praetereunt.

    19. I read a Dutch edition. The Epodes were less fresh than Satires and a bit more difficult. The Odes I liked more.

    20. For me, the epodes are better than the odes. I dunno what to to say about Horace. Some of the odes are very boring. What else? Someone gave him a farm. Horace was kind of a sell-out in the end.

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